Tag Archives: oppression

Soil, Struggle and Justice

brazil landless movement

CUSLAR, Latin-American Studies Program and Latino Studies Program Present the Film:

Soil, Struggle and Justice:
Agroecology in the Brazilian Landless Movement

With filmmaker Andreas Hernandez

7pm, Tuesday February 25th
Free
History of Art Gallery, Goldwin Smith Hall Basement level,
Cornell University

This documentary is the story of a cooperative of the Brazilian Landless Movement (MST) in the South of Brazil, which struggled for access to land and then transitioned to ecological agriculture, or agroecology. This MST cooperative is demonstrating the possibility of an alternative model of flourishing rural life, which provides thriving livelihoods for farmers, produces high quality and low cost food for the region, and rehabilitates the earth.

Andreas Hernandez is Chair of the Department of International Studies at Marymount Manhattan College in New York City.

Veganism: Living a Question vs. Fundamentalism

My veganism started out hazy and ignorant, became somewhat fundamentalist, and more recently, has become more honest and nuanced. Here’s a snapshot of that journey.
Continue reading Veganism: Living a Question vs. Fundamentalism

Stand against racism in Ithaca

From the The Shawn Greenwood Working Group:

Thank you to everyone who came out for last Tuesday’s community conversation at the A.M.E. Zion Church. We were able to put Mayor Myrick’s proposed replacement of Gino Bush as a commissioner on the Community Police Board (CPB) into the larger context of systemic racism. Common Council will vote on this issue on Wednesday, June 5, and we need your help.

This conversation can’t stop here.

Show Up! Speak Out!

Wednesday, June 5th, 6pm, Common Council Meeting

City Hall, 108 E. Green Street

Please come at 6pm and fill out a card to have your voice heard in the public comment.
Continue reading Stand against racism in Ithaca

Do you know how to listen?

I attended a free listening workshop here in Ithaca in 2011 that was really amazing. I went after I’d already been in Ithaca’s Talking Circles on Race and Racism — which are so wonderful, but so dependent on good communication. I really think I could have been a better listener (and a better white ally) if I’d attended the Listening Workshop before the Talking Circles!

The main idea is that usually, people aren’t really, truly listening to each other. They’re kind of waiting so they can speak. For instance, when someone says something about oppression, the other person isn’t necessarily listening with an open heart, ready to hear every painful detail — they’re usually going through a whole list of automatic, unhelpful responses (agreeing or disagreeing, questioning, giving advice, problem solving, thinking of a similar experience, coming up with reasons or explanations, etc. — there’s a list on our refrigerator!). The result is that we don’t actually hear what the other is saying. It takes awareness and practice to move away from these automatic responses, but I’ve got to say that it is well worth the effort. It really changed the way I communicate with people, for the better.

Think about what widespread adoption of this approach to communication could do for our world. Learning to be better listeners can only help our struggles for social and environmental justice. When someone speaks of their experience of racism or classism or heterosexism or sexism or any other oppression, it may stir up memories of things you read, or movies you saw, but that doesn’t mean that those are fit responses; the other is talking about their life, and now is not the time for anecdotes about movies, but for listening. Likewise, it might be painful to hear how we harm animals by not being vegan, but shouldn’t we at least listen to the voices of those we’re harming (via their proxies and spokespeople, those humans who can speak in words we can understand, who seem to have animals’ interests in mind)?

If you’re an activist, my guess is you’d like to be listened to. We have to be the change we want to see, so we need to work on our own listening.

Anyway, I can’t recommend these programs highly enough — and there happens to be a Listening Workshop SATURDAY, April 13th, 9am-12:30pm (they ask folks to please be 5 minutes early).

It will be held at the Ithaca Community Childcare Center (IC3), which is a really cool building at 579 Warren Road Ithaca, NY 14850 between the medical campus and Boces on Warren Road. Please bring snacks/beverages, and register at: www.thelisteningworkshop.com. It is 100% free.

TODAY: Celebrate People’s History Art Show at the Ink Shop

underground-railroad

Art Opening Friday, April 5th – Ink Shop Printmaking Center

People’s History: This show, curated by Ryan Clover-Owens, will feature artwork from the Just Seeds Artists’ Collective, a group of contemporary artists who have addressed a myriad of topics in the “Celebrate People’s History” series, from Emma Goldman and Malcom X to the Occupation of Alcatraz and the Zapatista uprising in Mexico. The show is an educational program of the Durland Alternatives Library at Cornell University and is comprised of about 60 posters.

Ink Shop Printmaking Center (2nd floor)
at Community School of Music and Arts
330 MLK Street / E. State Street 1st floor
Legacy Foundation Gallery Hallway Ithaca, NY 14850

Ink Shop Hours: Tuesday to Friday 12 -6 PM, Sat 12-4 PM; CSMA Hours: Monday-Thursday 10-6 and Friday 9-5

Contact: The Ink Shop 607 277-3884
Email: artists@ink-shop.org Web site: www.ink-shop.org

Event listing at AlternativesLibrary.org »

Masculinity in the kitchen

In Do We Have The Courage To Raise Our Sons More Like Our Daughters?, Lynn Beisner tells a story about how changing gender norms have allowed her to continue a treasured family tradition of passing on a beloved (presumably non-vegan, but that’s not the point here!) toffee recipe — because her son was ready to take up the torch when her daughter wasn’t. She writes,

I love how my son is challenging all of the gender assumptions I didn’t even know I still had. I love that somehow, against all odds, I managed to raise a guy who cannot have his masculinity threatened because it does not reside in what other people think of him.

As I read this lovely post, I thought of all of the amazing vegan men I know, who are willing to stop eating animals, though so many human cultures seem to equate meat eating and dominance over nature with masculinity. I love that so many men are becoming so willing to help build a more equitable, peaceful, cooperative culture, in these different ways. Maybe the kitchen is a good place to start, since it’s a place where women and animals have been oppressed for a long time.

Maybe one day women won’t fear men, and animals won’t fear humans. Can we make that happen, together?

Speaking Truth to Power: Understanding the Dominant, Animal-Eating Narrative for Vegan Empowerment and Social Transformation

Photo: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals
Photo: Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals

Powerful stuff from Melanie Joy:

We can practice proactive, rather than reactive, veganism. When we practice proactive veganism, we resist the carnistic fictions and we hold onto the truth of our experience without invalidating others…

Click here to read the rest.